Native American human remains and associated funerary objects: Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI— Inventory from unknown locations in Hawaiian Islands,

 
CONTENT

[Federal Register: October 28, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 208)]

[Notices]

[Page 57705-57706]

From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]

[DOCID:fr28oc98-101]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects from the Hawaiian Islands in the Possession of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

AGENCY: National Park Service, DOI.

ACTION: Notice.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects from the Hawaiian Islands in the possession of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI.

A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Bishop Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, the Hawai'i Island Burial Council, the Kaua'i/Ni'ihau Island Burial Council, the Maui/Lanai'i Island Burial Council, the Moloka'i Island Burial Council, the O'ahu Island Burial Council, Ka Lahui Hawai'i, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai'i Nei, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.

In 1891, human remains representing 24 individuals from unknown locations in the Hawaiian Islands were transferred to the Bishop Museum from the Hawaiian Government Museum collections. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

In 1910, human remains representing one individual from an unknown location in the Hawaiian Islands were donated to the Bishop Museum by the Hawaiian Board of Missions. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

In 1928, human remains representing one individual from an unknown location in the Hawaiian Islands were donated to the Bishop Museum by an unknown donor. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a burial kapa.

In 1928, human remains representing four individuals from unknown location(s) in the Hawaiian Islands were donated to the Bishop Museum by an unknown donor. No known individuals were identified. The six associated funerary objects are kapa, basketry, newspaper, and a wood block with glass fragment.

In 1952, human remains representing one individual were donated to the Bishop Museum by the Estate of Samuel Damon. These remains had been removed as some earlier date from an unknown burial cave. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a piece of kapa.

At an unknown date, human remains representing two individuals from unknown location(s) in the Hawaiian Islands were donated to the Bishop Museum by an unknown donor. In 1995, these human remains were found in Bishop Museum collections and accessioned at that time. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

In 1995, human remains representing three individuals were found in Bishop Museum collections and accessioned at that time. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

In 1996, human remains representing 55 individuals were found in Bishop Museum collections and accessioned at that time. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

Also in 1996, human remains representing four individuals were found in Bishop Museum collections and accessioned at that time. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

During consultation with Native Hawaiian organizations, the Bishop Museum decided that no attempt would be made to determine the age of the human remains. Geographic location, manner of interment, and types of associated funerary object are all consistent with Native Hawaiian tradition.

Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Bishop Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of 95 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Bishop Museum have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the eight objects listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human

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remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Bishop Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, the Hawai'i Island Burial Council, the Kaua'i/ Ni'ihau Island Burial Council, the Maui/Lanai'i Island Burial Council, the Moloka'i Island Burial Council, the O'ahu Island Burial Council, Ka Lahui Hawai'i, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai'i Nei, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.

This notice has been sent to officials of the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, the Hawai'i Island Burial Council, the Kaua'i/ Ni'ihau Island Burial Council, the Maui/Lanai'i Island Burial Council, the Moloka'i Island Burial Council, the O'ahu Island Burial Council, Ka Lahui Hawai'i, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai'i Nei, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Janet Ness, Registrar, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, HI 96817; telephone: (808) 848-4105, before November 27, 1998. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, the Hawai'i Island Burial Council, the Kaua'i/ Ni'ihau Island Burial Council, the Maui/Lanai'i Island Burial Council, the Moloka'i Island Burial Council, the O'ahu Island Burial Council, Ka Lahui Hawai'i, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai'i Nei, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Dated: October 15, 1998. Francis P. McManamon, Departmental Consulting Archeologist, Archeology and Ethnography Program.

[FR Doc. 98-28808Filed10-27-98; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4310-70-F