Public Meeting: 21st Century Customs Framework

 
CONTENT
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Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 245 / Friday, December 21, 2018 / Notices
Register. It is possible that the study
may validate the status quo (no routing
measures) and conclude that no changes
are necessary. It is also possible that the
study may recommend one or more
changes to enhance navigational safety
and the efficiency of vessel traffic
management. The recommendations
may lead to future rulemakings or
appropriate international agreements.
This notice is published under the
authority of 5 U.S.C. 552(a).
Dated: December 4, 2018.
Melissa L. Rivera,
Captain, U.S. Coast Guard, Chief of Staff,
Seventeenth Coast Guard District.
[FR Doc. 2018–27604 Filed 12–20–18; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9110–04–P
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND
SECURITY
U.S. Customs and Border Protection
[Docket No. USCBP–2018–0045]
Public Meeting: 21st Century Customs
Framework
AGENCY
: U.S. Customs and Border
Protection (CBP), Department of
Homeland Security (DHS).
ACTION
: Notice of public meeting and
request for public comments.
SUMMARY
: U.S. Customs and Border
Protection (CBP) is cognizant of the
need to stay modern in order to meet the
challenges of an evolving trade
landscape. New actors, industries, and
modes of conducting business have
emerged, disrupting the traditional
global supply chain. To continue to
effectively fulfill CBP’s mission, CBP is
pursuing an initiative titled ‘‘The 21st
Century Customs Framework.’’ ‘‘The
21st Century Customs Framework’’ will
seek to address and enhance numerous
aspects of CBP’s trade mission to better
position CBP to operate in the 21st
century trade environment. Through
preliminary efforts, CBP has identified
key themes for which CBP seeks public
input: Emerging Roles in the Global
Supply Chain, Intelligent Enforcement,
Cutting-Edge Technology, Data Access
and Sharing, 21st Century Processes,
and Self-Funded Customs
Infrastructure. To that end, CBP is
announcing a public meeting to discuss
these themes. CBP will use the public
comments received in response to this
notice to initiate discussion at the
public meeting for CBP to consider
possible policy, regulatory, and
statutory improvements to further the
trade mission. CBP is already pursuing
related efforts through the Border
Interagency Executive Council and the
Commercial Customs Operations
Advisory Committee and is ensuring
coordination among these initiatives.
DATES
: Meeting: The meeting to discuss
‘‘The 21st Century Customs
Framework’’ will be held on Friday,
March 1, 2019, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. EST.
Pre-registration: Members of the
public wishing to attend the meeting
whether in-person or via teleconference
must register as indicated in the
ADDRESSES
section by 5:00 p.m. EST,
February 4, 2019.
Cancellation of pre-registration:
Members of the public who are pre-
registered to attend in-person or via
teleconference and later need to cancel,
please do so by 5:00 p.m. EST, February
22, 2019.
Submission of comments: Members of
the public wishing to submit comments
must do so by 5:00 p.m. EST, February
4, 2019 by the methods described in the
ADDRESSES
section.
ADDRESSES
: Meeting: The meeting will
be conducted in-person and via
teleconference. The in-person meeting
will be held at the U.S. International
Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW,
Washington, DC 20436. The
teleconference number will be provided
to all registrants by 5:00 p.m. EST on
February 28, 2019. For information on
services for individuals with disabilities
or to request special assistance at the
meeting, contact Mr. Brandon Lord,
Office of Trade, U.S. Customs & Border
Protection, at (202) 325–6432 or email,
21CCF@cbp.dhs.gov as soon as possible.
Pre-registration: Meeting participants
may attend either in-person or via
teleconference after pre-registering
using one of the methods indicated
below. All in-person attendees must
pre-register by 5:00 p.m. EST, February
4, 2019; on-site registration is not
permitted.
For members of the public who plan
to attend the meeting in-person, please
register online at https://teregistration.
cbp.gov/index.asp?w=145.
For members of the public who plan
to participate via teleconference, please
register online at https://teregistration.
cbp.gov/index.asp?w=146 by 5:00 p.m.
EST, February 4, 2019.
Please feel free to share this
information with other interested
members of your organization or
association.
Members of the public who are pre-
registered to attend and later need to
cancel, please do so by 5:00 p.m. EST,
February 22, 2019, utilizing the
following links: https://
teregistration.cbp.gov/cancel.asp?w=145
to cancel an in-person registration or
https://teregistration.cbp.gov/cancel.
asp?w=146 to cancel a teleconference
registration.
Submission of comments: To facilitate
public participation, we are inviting
public comment on the six themes
described below. Comments must be
submitted in writing no later than
February 4, 2019, must be identified by
Docket No. USCBP–2018–0045, and
may be submitted by one (1) of the
following methods:
Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://
www.regulations.gov. Follow the
instructions for submitting comments.
Email: 21CCF@cbp.dhs.gov. Include
the docket number (USCBP–2018–0045)
in the subject line of the message.
Mail: Mr. Brandon Lord, Office of
Trade, U.S. Customs and Border
Protection, 1331 Pennsylvania Avenue
NW, Suite 950N, Washington, DC
20229.
Instructions: All submissions received
must include the words ‘‘Department of
Homeland Security’’ and the docket
number (USCBP–2018–0045) for this
action. If you wish to give a public
statement in-person during the meeting,
please do not send your comments
through the Federal eRulemaking portal
as certain identification information is
required for CBP to contact you, and all
comments sent to the portal will be
posted without change. Please do not
submit personal information to the
Federal eRulemaking portal. For those
who wish to give a public statement in-
person during the meeting, please send
your comments to the email or mail
address above, indicate your interest in
speaking and include the following
information: First and last name; title/
position; phone number; email address;
name and type of organization; and
identify the theme you will speak to
(each individual will be limited to one
public statement on one theme). CBP
will then post your comment on the
docket without the personal
information.
Docket: For access to the docket or to
read background documents or
comments, go to http://
www.regulations.gov and search for
Docket Number USCBP–2018–0045. To
submit a comment, click the ‘‘Comment
Now!’’ button located on the top-right
hand side of the docket page.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT
: Mr.
Brandon Lord, Office of Trade, U.S.
Customs and Border Protection, 1331
Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 950N,
Washington, DC 20229; telephone (202)
325–6432 or email 21CCF@cbp.dhs.gov.
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION
:
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Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 245 / Friday, December 21, 2018 / Notices
21st Century Customs Framework
Initiative Overview
CBP is cognizant of the need to stay
modern in order to meet the challenges
of an evolving trade landscape. New
actors, industries, and modes of
conducting business have emerged,
disrupting the traditional global supply
chain. To continue to effectively fulfill
CBP’s mission, CBP is pursuing an
initiative titled ‘‘The 21st Century
Customs Framework.’’ ‘‘The 21st
Century Customs Framework’’ will seek
to address and enhance numerous
aspects of CBP’s trade mission to better
position the agency to operate in the
21st century trade environment.
Through preliminary efforts, CBP has
identified key themes for which CBP
seeks public input: (1) Emerging Roles
in the Global Supply Chain; (2)
Intelligent Enforcement; (3) Cutting-
Edge Technology; (4) Data Access and
Sharing; (5) 21st Century Processes; and
(6) Self-Funded Customs Infrastructure.
Brief descriptions of each theme are
provided in this document along with
the request for public comments on
questions posed by CBP related to each
theme.
Members of the public who wish to
provide a public statement should
follow the instructions under the
Addresses section. Due to time and
content considerations, it is possible
that not all persons who express an
interest in making a public statement
will be able to do so. Speakers will be
selected based on time considerations
and to ensure the panel receives diverse,
individual perspectives. CBP will begin
selecting and contacting individuals to
deliver public statements starting no
earlier than February 11, 2019. Members
of the public may submit as many
written comments as they wish;
however, any commenter who is
selected to provide a public statement
will be limited to one timeslot
addressing one theme.
Agenda
21st Century Customs Framework Public
Meeting
9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.—Public Statements
and Open Public Comment on
Themes
As described above, members of the
public may submit as many written
comments as they wish; however, any
one individual will be selected for only
one public statement theme and
timeslot.
(1) Emerging Roles in the Global Supply
Chain
Due to technological advances and
new modes of conducting business, the
modern international trade environment
is marked by emerging actors and
dynamic supply chains. CBP’s
traditional legal frameworks were
developed to primarily reflect
containerized shipments and the supply
chain to support such shipments, as
opposed to small packages and business
models built around e-commerce. CBP
is seeking to ensure that all parties in
the modern supply chain are aware of
their responsibilities to promote safety
and compliance, while still enabling
legitimate trade and economic
prosperity.
Public Comment Questions
What new roles in the global supply
chain are unaccounted for in CBP’s
current legal framework? How should
the agency account for these roles?
How can CBP work with e-
commerce platforms and carriers to
identify and deter illicit shipments?
How can new actors in the global
supply chain work with CBP to improve
trade security?
(2) Intelligent Enforcement
CBP’s efforts on intelligent
enforcement are anchored on further
improving risk management and the
impact of efforts to detect high-risk
activity, deter non-compliance and
disrupt fraudulent behavior—all in the
interest of enforcing U.S. trade laws to
protect America’s economic security.
CBP’s intelligent enforcement efforts
include exploring how to better utilize
technology, big data, and predictive
analytics to drive decision-making.
Public Comment Questions
What technologies are useful in
predicting violative activities and an
entity’s potential for violations?
What tools or sources of
information regarding CBP’s compliance
requirements have you found the most
useful? What other resources can CBP
provide to ensure that trade
stakeholders understand CBP
requirements?
How can CBP improve violation
referral systems and allegation
processing?
(3) Cutting-Edge Technology
One of the defining features of the
modern trade environment is the rapid
emergence of new technology. CBP is
exploring the use of new technologies to
improve trade facilitation and trade
enforcement activities.
Public Comment Questions
What emerging technologies are
most important for CBP to monitor or
adopt?
What technologies are being
adopted by the private sector that are
incompatible with CBP’s current legal or
policy frameworks?
What technologies on the horizon
have the potential to be a disruptive
force (enabling or challenging) within
the trade ecosystem?
(4) Data Access and Sharing
The volume and types of data and the
speed at which the data can be
transmitted create a valuable
opportunity for CBP and trade
stakeholders. CBP is examining how
more efficient data sharing can improve
trade facilitation and trade enforcement.
At the same time, CBP is looking at
ways to reduce the duplication or
unnecessary capture of data.
Public Comment Questions
What data would you like CBP to
share with importers, and vice versa, to
improve trade facilitation and
enforcement?
How can CBP’s overall data sharing
with trade stakeholders be improved?
(5) 21st Century Trade Processes
CBP will be refining certain import
processes to reflect the modern trade
environment, improve the experience of
importers, brokers, and other important
actors in the supply chain, and increase
overall efficiency. CBP is placing a focus
on processes that may be overly
burdensome or outdated.
Public Comment Questions
What specific import procedures or
requirements can be improved or
refined, and how?
What are some international best
practices (i.e., processes used by other
customs agencies) that CBP should
examine?
(6) Self-Funded Customs Infrastructure *
* There will be no in-person
statements related to this theme.
New requirements affecting CBP,
Partner Government Agencies (PGA),
and trade industry will necessitate
updates to the Automated Commercial
Environment (ACE) outside of
reoccurring maintenance. CBP is
examining avenues to ensure that the
ACE has a consistent stream of funding
for enhancements and new
functionalities.
Public Comment Questions
Outside of the annual Congressional
appropriations cycle, what mechanisms
should CBP explore for consistent and
timely funding for ACE enhancements?
How could the fee collection
process be streamlined, improved, or
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Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 245 / Friday, December 21, 2018 / Notices
redesigned to more directly fund ACE
enhancements?
Dated: December 18, 2018.
Brenda B. Smith,
Executive Assistant Commissioner, Office of
Trade.
[FR Doc. 2018–27716 Filed 12–20–18; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9111–14–P
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND
SECURITY
[Docket No. DHS–2018–0067]
Privacy Act of 1974; System of
Records.
AGENCY
: Department of Homeland
Security.
ACTION
: Notice of a modified system of
records.
SUMMARY
: In accordance with the
Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of
Homeland Security (DHS) proposes to
modify a current DHS system of records
titled ‘‘DHS/ALL–007 Accounts Payable
System of Records.’’ This system of
records allows DHS to collect and
maintain payment records. DHS is
updating this system of records notice
(SORN) to change the system location
and clarify the authorities for which the
records are collected. DHS is also
expanding the categories of records
collected by including invoices,
receipts, and bank account numbers.
DHS is modifying routine use E and
adding routine use F to this SORN to
comply with Office of Management and
Budget (OMB) Memorandum M–17–12.
Routine use L is also being modified to
account for sharing payment
information with the Department of
Treasury to determine an individual’s
eligibility to receive federal payments.
Additionally, this notice includes non-
substantive changes to simplify the
formatting and text of the previously
published notice.
DATES
: Submit comments on or before
January 22, 2019. This modified system
will be effective upon publication. New
or modified routine uses will be
effective January 22, 2019.
ADDRESSES
: You may submit comments,
identified by docket number DHS–
2018–0067 by one of the following
methods:
Federal e-Rulemaking Portal: http://
www.regulations.gov. Follow the
instructions for submitting comments.
Fax: 202–343–4010.
Mail: Philip S. Kaplan, Chief
Privacy Officer, Privacy Office,
Department of Homeland Security,
Washington, DC 20528–0655.
Instructions: All submissions received
must include the agency name and
docket number DHS–2018–0067. All
comments received will be posted
without change to http://
www.regulations.gov, including any
personal information provided.
Docket: For access to the docket to
read background documents or
comments received, go to http://
www.regulations.gov.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT
: For
general questions and for privacy issues,
please contact: Philip S. Kaplan,
Privacy@hq.dhs.gov, (202) 343–1717,
Chief Privacy Officer, Privacy Office,
Department of Homeland Security,
Washington, DC 20528–0655.
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION
:
I. Background
DHS is modifying and reissuing DHS/
ALL–007 Accounts Payable SORN. DHS
uses records covered by this SORN to
meet its obligation to manage
Departmental funds and ensure that
DHS pays its creditors, including DHS
employees for travel related
reimbursements, and ensures that DHS
has an accurate accounting of money it
owes. DHS is updating this SORN to
provide notice that the location of
financial management activities for all
DHS Components will be housed at
DHS facilities and on DHS information
systems, instead of the Department of
Interior as was stated in the previous
SORN. DHS is also clarifying its
authorities to collect accounts payable
information.
The Department is expanding the
categories of records contained in this
SORN to include bank account
information, invoices, and receipts, to
more accurately reflect the financial
records needed by DHS to verify monies
owed and track payments to
individuals. Further, routine use E is
being modified and routine use F is
being added to be in conformity with
OMB Memorandum M–17–12. Routine
Use L is being modified to incorporate
information sharing with the
Department of Treasury’s ‘‘Do Not Pay’’
program, which determines federal
eligibility for dispersment of payments
by checking death records, federal debt
records, and lists of sanctioned
individuals. Additionally, this notice
includes non-substantive changes to
simplify the formatting and text of the
previously published notice.
This system of records does not
include information to enable travel
service providers under contract to the
Federal Government to authorize, issue,
or account for travel and travel
reimbursements provided to individuals
on official Federal Government
business, which are covered under
GSA/GOVT–4 Contracted Travel
Services Program, 74 FR 26700 (June 3,
2009), and GSA/GOVT–4 Contracted
Travel Services Program, 74 FR 28048
(June 12, 2009).
Consistent with DHS’s information
sharing mission, information stored in
the DHS/ALL–007 Accounts Payable
system of records may be shared with
other DHS Components that have a need
to know the information to carry out
their national security, law enforcement,
immigration, intelligence, or other
homeland security functions. In
addition, DHS may share information
with appropriate federal, state, local,
tribal, territorial, foreign, and
international government agencies,
members of the public, and other
entities consistent with the routine uses
set forth in this system of records notice.
This updated system will be included in
DHS’s inventory of record systems.
II. Privacy Act
The Privacy Act embodies fair
information practice principles in a
statutory framework governing the
means by which Federal Government
agencies collect, maintain, use, and
disseminate individuals’ records. The
Privacy Act applies to information that
is maintained in a ‘‘system of records.’’
A ‘‘system of records’’ is a group of any
records under the control of an agency
from which information is retrieved by
the name of an individual or by some
identifying number, symbol, or other
identifying particular assigned to the
individual. In the Privacy Act, an
individual is defined to encompass U.S.
citizens and lawful permanent
residents. Additionally, the Judicial
Redress Act (JRA) provides covered
persons with a statutory right to make
requests for access and amendment to
covered records, as defined by the JRA,
along with judicial review for denials of
such requests. In addition, the JRA
prohibits disclosures of covered records,
except as otherwise permitted by the
Privacy Act.
Below is a description of the DHS/
ALL–007 Accounts Payable System of
Records. In accordance with 5 U.S.C.
552a(r), DHS has provided a report of
this revised system of records to the
Office of Management and Budget and
to Congress.
SYSTEM NAME AND NUMBER
Department of Homeland Security
(DHS)/ALL–007 Accounts Payable.
SECURITY CLASSIFICATION
:
Unclassified.
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